Missing Money, Dodgy Songs & Schadenfreude

The Rangers administration saga is less than a week old and we’ve been fortunate to see a few gems this week.

The inflatable advertising hoarding that wouldn’t stay up, administrators admitting they couldn’t find the £24 Million from Ticketus and Kilmarnock winning at Ibrox after the Rangers faithful assembled to a cry of ‘We’re not walking away’.

Seemingly, they did walk away in numbers before the final whistle blew but before signing a few of the old ‘party songs’ and further miring Rangers in bother. I heard the half time report on radio and the boo-ing was evident from the home support.

Throw in the sight of a late night current affairs show that had two luminaries of the Celtic support arguing over whether their club was dependent on their ailing rival and the biscuit has probably been taken.

Week one of how many? I’m sure I’ll find it tiresome soon enough, hopefully the entertaining nuggets keep on cropping up.

The dodgy songs were inevitable, an article in the Scotsman on Saturday flagged up the attitudes of Rangers fans in better days.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/glenn_gibbons_pride_and_profligacy_a_prelude_to_rangers_fall_1_2124217

Murray’s pot-hunting bluster and bravado appealed to Rangers supporters’ innate taste for triumphalism.

Glenn Gibbons nailed an era in a sentence.

He also flagged up an event from Saturday before it happened:-

Even the most successful managers at Ibrox have had to tolerate booing of their team for committing the capital offence of being a goal down at half-time, long before a match is completed

I saw an equally beguiling piece in the Guardian website but for a different reason.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/feb/19/kevin-mackenna-rangers-scottish-football

Those people who claim that we would all thrive after the death of Rangers FC are deluding themselves. They tend to fall into three categories. In the first group, we see middle-class faux intellectuals who will talk loftily of abjuring sectarianism and all sorts of unpleasantness among hoi polloi. Many of them will follow Scotland’s international rugby team, an outfit so bad that among the 10 or so countries which take this minority of minority sports seriously we are currently 11th.

 

In the second group, there are supporters of clubs from Scotland’s other three big cities. To a certain extent, you can understand their position. If the Ibrox club was forced into liquidation and compelled to start life again as Rangers 2012 in the Scottish Third Division, these clubs could begin to dream again. They would cast their minds back to the 50s and 60s when Hibs, Hearts and Dundee shared five titles. Perhaps they would dream of the early 1980s when Aberdeen and Dundee United broke the century-long domination of the Old Firm and reached European finals.

The third group were of course, Celtic fans, of which the writer was one.

To summarise my reaction to that article, it’d be ‘ooft’.

There are football supporters of all hues across Scotland, and indeed beyond, that have varying interest in the SPL, the Old Firm and Rangers. For myself as a ‘diddy fan’ it varies between irritation at the even ‘Old Firm’ split of back pages of Scottish tabloids and exasperation at the latest antics of their supporters.

I’m no ‘intellectual rugby fan’, I’m not a ‘New Firm’ Aberdeen or Dundee Utd fan hoping for a return to those glory years of the early eighties.

I’m a St Mirren fan who is old enough to know why St Mirren got rooked in the early nineties and how bitter that medicine tasted.

Saints never went into administration, never went bust, never became a back page crisis.

I do believe that all supporters of the Scottish national game have a valid and worthwhile input, even those of Old Firm fans who have been slugging it out in the nightly football phone-ins this week. They might be making daft points or comments that one particular host reckons requires medical attention, but they care, they watch their teams and lap up all forms of coverage.

They even give Sky Sports money for subscriptions…

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